Community discussions

MikroTik App
 
turkel
just joined
Topic Author
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2020 10:33 pm

RB3011 internal Power Supply

Mon Jan 18, 2021 9:32 pm

Hi All,

I use my RB3011 with 24v 1.2A power supply which is included inside package. But I need improvement!
I see there are space for internal power supply and IEC standart socket hole on back of cacing. Please advise if someone installed internal PSU for RB3011 and what is required for it. Is there are any documentation out there?

Almost a month of usage of this awsome router I learned and solve all my network requirements. Seems stabile for now.

Regards,
Turkel
 
turkel
just joined
Topic Author
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2020 10:33 pm

Re: RB3011 internal Power Supply

Fri Jan 22, 2021 11:07 pm

none did it?
I think without external adaptor it is easy to wire and looks more profesional.
 
Kaldek
Frequent Visitor
Frequent Visitor
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2015 2:40 pm

Re: RB3011 internal Power Supply

Wed Jan 27, 2021 1:38 pm

You could easily do this. Buy a 24v power supply from element14, something between 1 and 3 amps is heaps of power for an RB3011. Wire the 24v output directly to the RB3011 board and use one of the existing blanking plates for the mains power connector on the back.
 
andrew3000
just joined
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri May 21, 2021 12:03 am

Re: RB3011 internal Power Supply

Fri May 21, 2021 1:22 am

Yes, I did it. I'm sure others have too...

I put in a nice commercial Mean Well IRM-60-24ST encapsulated 100-277vAC 60W/24vDC power supply with a good filtered C13/C14 AC input (no fuse or switch).
It's internal, better/cleaner power, more watts, soft start, grounded, but requires some work.

The reason they don't do it is because then the router box would have to pass different certifications and would cost more. So, the external power brick is cheap and easy.

The mod is about $30 in parts (plus little stuff). Soldering required. I guess you could use the existing power brick DC cord as a pigtail and just do it that way (no soldering).

The router only uses about 10W idle. More watts when doing work, so the factory 28W power supply is more than enough unless you use the power output and would need extra watts.
I picked this power supply because it was all voltage input, 24V/60W, and the right size to mount in the existing space. Even de-rated for extreme heat it would provide more than enough power.

I cut a notch at the side of each of the four mounting holes on the power supply so it would just slide onto the four existing mounting tabs. It is rather secure but I used strong double sided tape on the bottom of the internal power supply to make sure. It's not going anywhere. I did use a good soldering iron to connect the wires to the board. You could cut off the DC plug from the adapter and feed it through the cooling holes and just plug it into the existing socket. A little weird, but easy to do. I just connected the AC ground to a good internal screw (like the external ground would have).

I would guess the "factory" option would have used a metal hold down strap over the power supply and be secured by two screws in the existing holes. The sticky tape was easier for me.

See attached photos...
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
 
dot02
Frequent Visitor
Frequent Visitor
Posts: 77
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2021 1:23 am

Re: RB3011 internal Power Supply

Sun Aug 21, 2022 7:16 pm

Here's one of my builds:
3011 (1).jpg
Image

On the mainboard side, be sure to use a soldering iron with at least 50W, especially on the "ground" side, the heat is dissipated across a large area, so you want to be able to heat the soldering point in a few seconds.

For those who wonder, there is a fuse, it is the black round dot on the upper left corner of the PSU, so there was no need to add another, discrete one. An R/C filter is also already part of the PSU. Grounding is done over one of the screws that fixes the mainboard to the enclosure.
I glued 3 small epoxy-board squares on the enclosure (arsenic-based instand glue, so they would never ever come off), then I pre-drilled the holes (2,5mm) and used self-drilling 3mm screws to fix the board, ensuring enough clearance on both top and bottom of the enclosure.

I used a salvaged 24V, 1A PSU. This one is open frame, so it is absolutely essential to put a sticker on the enclosure stating that there are no user-serviceable parts inside, and that there is a risk of potential electric shock, possibly lethal!

I did not cover up the input jack because I use it as a power output to feed another device (check the total power consumption, it shall not exceed the power supply's capacity!

Disclaimer: This is potentially lethal, so I explicitly discourage you from building it on your own, unless you really know what you are doing and take full responsibility for that! There is a reason why Mikrorik did not sell this device with an onboard PSU! I am not responsible for any damage, including, but not limited to, injuries and/or death!
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: avsion and 7 guests